The Corner

Bury My Affirmative-Action Program at Wounded Knee

In my weekend column, I was inclined to give Elizabeth Warren, Harvard Law School’s sole tenured Native American, the benefit of the doubt that she was 1/32nd Cherokee. But it turns out I’m wrong. She’s 1/32nd Cherokee-forcible-remover:

Not only is it unlikely that Elizabeth Warren’s great-great-great grandmother was Cherokee, it turns out that Warren’s great-great-great grandfather was a member of a militia unit which participated in the round-up of the Cherokees in the prelude to the Trail of Tears.

If I understand the diversity enforcers, identity-group quotas are necessary to help correct historical injustices. In this case, Harvard Law School chose to help correct historical injustices against the Cherokees by hiring a descendant of one of the perpetrators to play their token Injun. Maybe it was a choice between her or that Klansman who passed himself off as “Little Tree” and wrote Oprah’s favorite heartwarming fake-Cherokee memoir.

In related news from London’s Metropolitan Police:

Blacklist Is Blacklisted: Met Bans Word Over Claims It Is Racist… And Staff Have To Say ‘Red Listed’

Redlisted? Hey, welcome to Elizabeth Warren’s world…

Mark Steyn — Mark Steyn is an international bestselling author, a Top 41 recording artist, and a leading Canadian human-rights activist.

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