The Corner

Camille Cosby: Bill Cosby Is ‘The Man You Thought You Knew.’

Camille Cosby has released the following statement:

I met my husband, Bill Cosby, in 1963, and we were married in 1964. The man I met, and fell in love with, and whom I continue to love, is the man you all knew through his work. He is a kind man, a generous man, a funny man, and a wonderful husband, father and friend. He is the man you thought you knew.

A different man has been portrayed in the media over the last two months. It is the portrait of a man I do not know. It is also a portrait painted by individuals and organizations whom many in the media have given a pass. There appears to be no vetting of my husband’s accusers before stories are published or aired. An accusation is published, and immediately goes viral.

We all followed the story of the article in “Rolling Stone” concerning allegations of rape at the University of Virginia. The story was heart-breaking, but ultimately appears to be proved to be untrue. Many in the media were quick to link that story to stories about my husband — until that story unwound.

None of us will ever want to be in the position of attacking a victim. But the question should be asked — who is the victim?

Separately, Cosby’s lawyer John Schmitt issued a statement regarding his offer to treat objective media like “royalty.”

On Saturday, the New York Post published an article by Stacy Brown indicating that Bill Cosby “broke his silence” Friday in a discussion with Mr. Brown. Various media outlets have reported on the story with the headline “Bill Cosby Speaks Out.” Mr. Cosby and Mr. Brown did in fact have a telephone conversation. Mr. Brown identified himself as a free-lance reporter for a number of African-American media outlets, which prompted Mr. Cosby’s comment regarding the African-American media. Mr. Brown did not indicate that he was interviewing Mr. Cosby for publication, did not say that he was reporting for the New York Post, and did not tell Mr. Cosby that the conversation was being recorded. In a discussion of journalistic standards, Mr. Brown failed to adhere to the most basic standards of his profession.

Cosby continues to lose public supporters. Atlanta-based Spelman College Monday eliminated a Cosby-endowed professorship, while Magic Johnson’s ASPiRE TV network canceled its heavy rotation of I Spy and The Bill Cosby Show.

The Daily Caller’s Patrick Howley last week investigated several Cosby accusers. More than 20 women have publicly stated that Cosby drugged and raped them between 1966 and 2004.

Courtesy of KatyWithAWhy.

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