The Corner

Cantor Pulls Out of Biden Talks

BREAKING — House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R., Va.) has decided to stop participating in the deficit negotiations led by Vice President Joe Biden, citing an “impasse” of the issue of tax increases.

“Each side came into these talks with certain orders, and as it stands the Democrats continue to insist that any deal must include tax increases,” Cantor said in a statement. “There is not support in the House for a tax increase, and I don’t believe now is the time to raise taxes in light of our current economic situation.”

Cantor told the Wall Street Journal that Wednesday’s meeting was far more contentious than past sessions, and talks repeatedly stalled over the tax issue. “At each meeting, it has become a little more difficult to ignore that divide,’’ he said. As a result, Cantor announced he would not attend today’s scheduled meeting.

Despite the impasse, Cantor remains optimistic, praising the vice president’s leadership in the negotiations, which have thus far yielded “trillions in spending cuts” and have “established a blueprint ” for meaningful fiscal reform. He called on President Obama to assume a bigger role in the discussions going forward. “I believe it is time for the President to speak clearly and resolve the tax issue,” said Cantor. “Once resolved, we have a blueprint to move forward to trillions of spending cuts and binding mechanisms to change the way things are done around here.”

Cantor’s decision marks a major turning point in the talks, as negotiators claim to be “down to the hard stuff,” continued to say that progress was being made. Indeed, positions have noticeably hardened in the last several days, especially on the Democratic side (See here, here and here). Meanwhile, President Obama is huddling with House Democrats today ahead of the meeting with Biden to discuss strategy.

Andrew StilesAndrew Stiles is a political reporter for National Review Online. He previously worked at the Washington Free Beacon, and was an intern at The Hill newspaper. Stiles is a 2009 ...

Most Popular

Law & the Courts

Judge Barrett on the Second Amendment

Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s impressive dissent in Kanter v. Barr (pp. 27-64) illustrates both her fidelity to the Supreme Court’s landmark Second Amendment ruling in District of Columbia v. Heller (2008) and her masterful application of the constitutional methodology of originalism. Rickey I. Kanter pleaded ... Read More
Law & the Courts

Judge Barrett on the Second Amendment

Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s impressive dissent in Kanter v. Barr (pp. 27-64) illustrates both her fidelity to the Supreme Court’s landmark Second Amendment ruling in District of Columbia v. Heller (2008) and her masterful application of the constitutional methodology of originalism. Rickey I. Kanter pleaded ... Read More
Law & the Courts

The Judicial Branch Ragnarök Is Upon Us

As expected, President Trump selected Amy Coney Barrett as his third nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, and now the Judicial Branch Ragnarök and Related Festival of Catholic-Bashing is upon us. Senate Democrats could argue that based upon Barrett’s past decisions, they don’t agree with her legal ... Read More
Law & the Courts

The Judicial Branch Ragnarök Is Upon Us

As expected, President Trump selected Amy Coney Barrett as his third nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, and now the Judicial Branch Ragnarök and Related Festival of Catholic-Bashing is upon us. Senate Democrats could argue that based upon Barrett’s past decisions, they don’t agree with her legal ... Read More
Law & the Courts

On Judge Barrett, Let’s Tell the Truth

Once when I was a kid, my dad held up three fingers and asked, “Does this two look like a three?” Little did I know that this attempted sleight of hand would become a regular feature of the process for appointing federal judges. Watch for it in the days ahead as the Senate considers President Donald Trump’s ... Read More
Law & the Courts

On Judge Barrett, Let’s Tell the Truth

Once when I was a kid, my dad held up three fingers and asked, “Does this two look like a three?” Little did I know that this attempted sleight of hand would become a regular feature of the process for appointing federal judges. Watch for it in the days ahead as the Senate considers President Donald Trump’s ... Read More