The Corner

Education

Career and Technical Education Is Important, but Some States Do Better than Others

Now that the College For Everyone nonsense is fading, more and more young people are thinking about other paths into the labor force, especially career and technical programs. Some states have figured out that they can help these people and at the same time give their business sectors a boost by devising Career and Technical Education (CTE) policies that encourage high-school students to get an early start on their job training.

Naturally, some states are doing CTE better than others. In today’s Martin Center article, Missourian Abigail Burrola looks at the CTE programs both in her state and neighboring Kentucky. She finds that Kentucky’s is easily the better of the two. The main difference is that Kentucky integrates CTE with local business more effectively than Missouri does.

Burrola concludes:

Students might know they have more than just the college option in hunting for a good job. States should make sure, however, that they connect students with industries. Kentucky’s model for collaboration could help states like Missouri improve their career training and outcomes for students.

George Leef is the the director of editorial content at the James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal.

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