The Corner

Classic Broder

See if you can follow the logic of this passage from his column touting the SERVE Act:

Despite all the goodwill, 19 senators, all Republicans, including the party’s two top leaders, voted against the law. The arguments were spurious. Sen. David Vitter of Louisiana, for example, charged that “this new federal bureaucracy would, in effect, politicize charitable activity around the country.”

But John Bridgeland, the former director of George W. Bush’s domestic policy council who lobbied for the bill, points out that its supporters ranged from AARP to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Ramesh Ponnuru is a senior editor for National Review, a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion, a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and a senior fellow at the National Review Institute.

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