The Corner

Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Says Rand Paul’s Opposition to AG Nominee Is Racist

Representative G. K. Butterfield (D., N.C.) accused Senator Rand Paul (R., Ky.) of opposing the confirmation of President Obama’s attorney-general nominee because she is “an African-American legal scholar.”

“The Congressional Black Caucus recognizes Senator Paul’s unfounded argument as nothing but an excuse to keep an African-American legal scholar from holding this high position, and we directly call on him and Republicans to allow the nomination of Loretta Lynch to proceed to an up or down vote in the Senate,” Butterfield, the chairman of the CBC, said in a Thursday statement.

Paul says he opposes Loretta Lynch’s taking over for Attorney General Eric Holder based on her support for civil-asset forfeiture.

“Civil forfeiture turns justice on its head,” Paul told Fox, per the Washington Examiner. “Instead of being innocent until proven guilty, you are guilty until proven innocent. The government takes your cash — $1,000, $100, $500, whatever it is. This program predominantly has targeted black individuals, poor individuals, Hispanic individuals. And when Sen. [Mike] Lee asked her about it in the committee, she said, ‘Oh, no, as long as there is a valid court order.’”

Butterfield’s willingness to level charges of racism knows no partisan boundaries. When some House Democrats tried to upset the current seniority system, Butterfield implied they might resent the fact that black politicians hold so many powerful posts.

“We’re now at a phase that many of our CBC members hold senior positions within the caucus, and we’re beginning to get ranking member positions all over the caucus — and why now?” Butterfield said. “It has worked well over the years. Why revisit it now and cause divisions within the Democratic Caucus?”

Via the Washington Examiner’s Ashe Schow.

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