The Corner

Debates and Racial Preferences

Staggering racial preferences are in use at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, according to two studies released this week by the Center for Equal Opportunity (CEO).

Black or Hispanic undergraduate applicants are 500 times more likely to be admitted than similarly situated white or Asian applicants. Black law-school applicants are 61 times more likely to be admitted than similarly situated white applicants.

CEO president and frequent NRO contributor Roger Clegg was shouted down when he appeared on Wisconsin’s campus for a press conference and debate on CEO’s findings. Scores of students mobbed the press conference, shouting insults and, according to Doubletree Hotel management, knocking hotel staff to the ground. Police had to be summoned.

The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that the University of Wisconsin has one of the highest gaps in black-white graduation rates among 293 public universities studied. This shouldn’t be a surprise. Studies presented to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights show that black law students who are the “beneficiaries” of preferences are two and a half times less likely to graduate than their white comparatives. Not unexpected when the median board scores for black and Hispanic admittees are up to 150 points lower than that for white and Asian admittees.

University officials have responded to CEO’s findings by claiming that the university’s admissions policies comply with the ”guidelines handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court.”

False. Profoundly so. I challenge any University of Wisconsin official to debate me on this issue. To make it fair, you can send two, three, or however many professors you need to defend your claim that you’re in compliance. Choose any neutral you wish to score the debate. I’ll even spot your side 10 points on a hundred point scale. Make that 20.

My only request is that the neutral be neutral and that no hotel employees get injured. Look forward to hearing from you.

Peter Kirsanow — Peter N. Kirsanow is an attorney and a member of the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

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