The Corner

Deroy Murdock on Giuliani’s Abortion Record

Murdock’s article is largely a defense of that record from a pro-life perspective. A couple of points.

1) Murdock writes: “An NRO editorial even predicted that ‘an America with Giuliani’s favored policies would be a country with more abortion — probably reversing the 15-year trend of decline…’ This conclusion is dubious. . .”

In context, what the editorial is saying here is that Giuliani would have all American states provide funding for abortion, and that this policy would increase the abortion rate. If Murdock disagrees with either portion of that claim, he should explain why.

2) Murdock again: “My NRO colleagues complained Monday that ‘New York City’s abortion rate had a long way to fall: Even after its decline, it remained much higher than the national average.’ Yes, it’s true. Mayor Giuliani did not erase abortion in New York City. But it fell plenty on his watch. Does he deserve no credit for that?”

Well, no, actually, he doesn’t. I don’t see why Giuliani should get credit for one cherry-picked statistic (abortion rates fell in NYC faster than the national average) while not getting blame for any of the other statistics (e.g., abortion rates fell faster statewide than they did in NYC). Murdock barely even tries to show that Giuliani did anything to bring the abortion rate down. For the most part, he merely points out that Giuliani could have been more aggressively pro-abortion. That hardly makes the case for him.

3) Murdock’s conclusion: “Giuliani also can help extract his bandwagon from this pothole by energetically embracing the Hyde Amendment — a law with which politicians Left, middle, and Right have made peace. Rudolph W. Giuliani cannot repeat this loudly and often enough: ‘Congress got Uncle Sam out of abortion funding in 1976, and I will keep Uncle Sam out of it.’”

Good advice. Now will Giuliani pledge to veto abortion funding if the Congress sends it to him?

Ramesh Ponnuru is a senior editor for National Review, a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion, a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and a senior fellow at the National Review Institute.

Most Popular

Culture

Cold Brew’s Insidious Hegemony

Soon, many parts of the United States will be unbearably hot. Texans and Arizonans will be able to bake cookies on their car dashboards; the garbage on the streets of New York will be especially pungent; Washington will not only figuratively be a swamp. And all across America, coffee consumers will turn their ... Read More
National Security & Defense

The Warmonger Canard

Whatever the opposite of a rush to war is — a crawl to peace, maybe — America is in the middle of one. Since May 5, when John Bolton announced the accelerated deployment of the Abraham Lincoln carrier group to the Persian Gulf in response to intelligence of a possible Iranian attack, the press has been aflame ... Read More
Immigration

The Merit of Merit-Based Immigration

Having chain-migrated his way into the White House and a little bit of political power, Donald Trump’s son-in-law is shopping around an immigration plan. And if you can get past the hilarious juxtaposition of the words “merit-based” and “Jared Kushner,” it’s a pretty good one. As things stand, the ... Read More
NR Webathon

Socialism Is about Taking, Not Giving

The snakiest of snake-oil pitches goes like this: Give us some of your freedom and we’ll take care of you. Socialists have been making similar claims back as far as Plato. The end result doesn’t have to be Venezuela. It can just be . . . Europe. What’s wrong with Europe? Despite a turn away from ... Read More
NR Webathon

We’ve Had Bill Barr’s Back

One of the more dismaying features of the national political debate lately is how casually and cynically Attorney General Bill Barr has been smeared. He is routinely compared to Roy Cohn on a cable-TV program that prides itself on assembling the most thoughtful and plugged-in political analysts and ... Read More