The Corner

Disturbing Similarities Between HealthCare.gov Hack and Earlier Attack

The HealthCare.gov hack shares some worrisome details with a successful attack last December on a Vermont health-exchange server, as I write this evening on the homepage.

In both cases, a basic — even stupid — security oversight allowed the hacker to gain access to a server. Likewise, both attacks took several weeks to detect. Both attacks seem to have originated, at least in part, from abroad. Here’s why the commonalities matter:

The similarities between the HealthCare.gov and Vermont attacks are significant because they suggest a top-to-bottom lack of security that afflicts the federal and state exchanges alike.

Michael Gregg, a cybersecurity expert who testified to Congress about HealthCare.gov risks, tells NRO this evening: “I think the most important take-away, unfortunately, is to still be very leery about how well these systems have actually been secured. We’re still potentially running code and applications that seem to be vulnerable at one point, and these systems may still be at this state: We’re still working with these patched systems. All this stuff should have been rebuilt from the ground up with security as the first thing in mind.”

Read the whole piece here.

— Jillian Kay Melchior is a Thomas L. Rhodes Fellow for the Franklin Center for Government and Public Integrity. She is also a Senior Fellow at the Independent Women’s Forum.

Most Popular

Law & the Courts

Censure Dianne Feinstein

Regardless of the fate of Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination, the Senate should censure the ranking Democratic member of the Judiciary Committee, Dianne Feinstein. Her deception and maneuvering, condemned across the political spectrum, seriously interfered with the Senate’s performance of its constitutional duty to ... Read More
U.S.

Are We on the Verge of Civil War?

Americans keep dividing into two hostile camps. It seems the country is back to 1860 on the eve of the Civil War, rather than in 2018, during the greatest age of affluence, leisure, and freedom in the history of civilization. The ancient historian Thucydides called the civil discord that tore apart the ... Read More