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Politics & Policy

Trump’s Campaign Manager Changes His Mind, Now Apparently Believes 9/11 Conspiracy Theories

Days after Donald Trump hijacked last weekend’s GOP debate to accuse former president George W. Bush of being at least indirectly to blame for 9/11, Trump’s campaign manager Corey Lewandowski began dabbling in conspiracy theories about the 2001 terrorist attacks. But before he worked for Trump, Lewandowski sang a much different tune.

Six years ago, as New Hampshire director of the conservative advocacy group Americans for Prosperity in the run up to 2010’s midterm elections, Lewandowski expressed skepticism over the 9/11 “truthers” on the ideological fringes of American politics, and warned Republicans against embracing them. At the time, he worried aloud that fringe elements in the Tea Party — including “birthers” who believed President Obama was born outside of the United States and “truthers” who believed the government was lying about 9/11 — had given New Hampshire Republicans “pause” about embracing the nascent political movement.

“I don’t think [Republicans are] ready to bring them into the fold,” Lewandowski said at the time. “They have the potential . . . to be burned.”

But on Monday, Lewandowski suggested to Breitbart News Radio that the Bush administration may have deliberately allowed the 9/11 attacks to happen. “They were well aware that things were taking place both on our soil and internationally,” Lewandowski said. “And, they either chose to do nothing about it, maybe through miscommunication, or weren’t prepared for it, or ignored it.”

“I don’t know which one it was, and it’s not for me to say,” he continued. “But what we do know is we had the worst terrorist attack on our soil during that administration — and that’s very clear — in a lifetime.”

 

 

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