The Corner

Education

Duke Divinity School Goes All-In for Diversity

While Duke historian Nancy MacLean has gotten most of the attention this year for her hatchet-job book on James Buchanan and those who believe in limited government, there have been some deplorable events at the Divinity School. In today’s Martin Center article, Professor John Staddon describes that school’s descent into the sheer madness of obsession with diversity.

Staddon begins with the furor last year when one senior faculty member dared voice his opinion that a “diversity training” seminar that had been planned would be a waste of time. Ah, but you just can’t say anything like that on a P.C. campus! That professor was hounded into retirement after being brought up on harassment charges.

That whetted the appetite of the social-justice-warrior types who have been drawn to Duke Divinity. They have put out a list of demands, about which Staddon writes:

The list of “demands” is both revealing and embarrassing. One demand asks for a non-discrimination policy “to be signed by all incoming students, faculty, and staff.” But other demands are in fact discriminatory: “To appoint a black trans woman or gender non-conforming theologian” as well as “a tenure-track trans woman theologian” and “tenure-track queer theologian of color, preferably a black or indigenous person.” And “At least 10 academic and 15 summer placements designated for trans and queer students at sites that are overtly affirming of LGBTQIA+ peoples (1/3 of these placements must be made up of predominantly people of color).”

No, this is not The Onion poking fun at today’s university. This is how “progressives” think — that righteousness depends on having quotas for groups.

And there are more demands, including a Queer Theology course and gender-neutral bathrooms, which must be “clearly marked.”

Of course, the Divinity School’s dean took all of this seriously, announcing the formation of an “Academic Affairs Task Force on Gender and Student Sexuality Concerns.”

Staddon thinks that the Duke Divinity School is in a “race to the bottom” and it’s impossible to disagree with his assessment. He suggests some educational correctives, but its diversity dementia has no doubt progressed too far.

George Leef — George Leef is the director of research for the John William Pope Center for Higher Education Policy.

Most Popular

Politics & Policy

The Origins of Progressive Agony

What has transformed the Democratic party into an anguished progressive movement that incorporates the tactics of the street, embraces maenadism, reverts to Sixties carnival barking, and is radicalized by a new young socialist movement? Even party chairman Tom Perez concedes that there are “no moderate ... Read More
Elections

How Will the Senate Races Break?

How will the Senate races break? We have less public polling to go on than in recent years, so answering that question is harder than ever. But the news is more optimistic for Republicans than it was a month ago.   Waves and Breakers Four years ago, I projected in mid September that if “historical ... Read More
PC Culture

Warren Is a Fraud

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) has been telling a story for years. It’s a deeply romantic story about her parents and their young love, fraught with the familial bigotry of an earlier time. Here’s how she told it this week in a video she released in preparation for her 2020 run: My daddy always said he ... Read More
U.S.

Two Minnesota Republican Candidates Assaulted

Two Republican candidates for state office in Minnesota have been physically assaulted in recent days, leading prominent Republican lawmakers to caution their Democratic colleagues against employing inflammatory rhetoric. Republican state representative Sarah Anderson was punched in the arm last week after ... Read More
Law & the Courts

A Christian Man Receives Justice

A good man’s legal ordeal is at an end. Yesterday, my friends and former colleagues at the Alliance Defending Freedom announced that former Atlanta fire chief Kelvin Cochran had reached a $1.2 million settlement, ending a case he brought after the city fired him for writing -- and distributing to a select few ... Read More