The Corner

Equal Pay Shouldn’t Have Gotten a Mention

The State of the Union contained a throw-away line: “We are going to crack down on violations of equal-pay laws — so that women get equal pay for an equal day’s work.” Presumably, this was included just so the president could check the box of having had something for the feminists. Yet it’s worth asking, how is this different than what’s being done now? Discrimination based on sex is already illegal, and presumably the administration has already been “cracking down” on companies that are mistreating women, or anyone else.

But what’s worse, the line continues to propagate the impression that women are still victims of systematic discrimination (they aren’t). And threats to ramp up federal investigations into the workplace hardly seem the best way to encourage employment.

It’s a throw-away line that should have been thrown away completely.

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History

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History

Thanksgiving Is Not a Lie

We live in a time of heedless iconoclasm, and so one of the country’s oldest traditions is under assault. Thanksgiving is increasingly portrayed as, at best, based on falsehoods and, at worst, a whitewash of genocide against Native Americans. The New York Times ran a piece the other day titled, “The ... Read More
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Culture

On Being Grateful

My mother always enjoyed making Thanksgiving dinner. She took a traditional Southern woman’s pride in being a good cook, following her mother’s recipes, and my family made a rare display of kindness by declining to inform her that she was a fairly dreadful cook, one whose kitchen alchemy on the electric range ... Read More
U.S.

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U.S.

Gratitude: What We Owe to Our Country

Editor’s Note: The following essay by National Review founder William F. Buckley comes from the first chapter of his 1990 book, Gratitude: Reflections on What We Owe to Our Country. I have always thought Anatole France’s story of the juggler to be one of enduring moral resonance. This is the arresting and ... Read More