The Corner

Fellow Travelers

My column this week looks at the curious and unholy alliances being forged between the Left and militant Islamists. I took pains to point out there are people and institutions on the Left who would never condone terrorism or apologize for radical Islam. Even so, I received a flurry of hate-mail from people who took offense and called me names — though not one of them disputed a fact or seriously debated a conclusion. (Of course, probably unhelpful was the headline one newspaper put on my column: “Liberals Hate America.” You think the editor who wrote that was trying to be subversive? Or is stupidity the more likely explanation?)

In today’s Wall Street Journal, David Horowitz has an op-ed on the various campus groups that routinely attempt to shut down free speech, cheer when they hear the word “communist,” and openly align with Islamists. Among those groups:

the International Socialist Organization, whose goal is the establishment of a “dictatorship of the proletariat” in the United States; Iranians for Peace and Justice, supporters of Hezbollah and Hamas; and Campus Progress, the unofficial college arm of the Democratic Party.

One of the local members of Campus Progress had written a column in the campus newspaper attacking me in advance of my talk, and defending Sami Al-Arian as a victim of political persecution. The conservative students who invited me to the University of Texas told me that organizations such as the Muslim Students Association routinely join with College Democrats in protests against the state of Israel.

There have to be grownups in the Democratic party who are uncomfortable about all this. More of them should have the courage to say so. Memo to DNC chairman Tim Kaine: Shouldn’t you get the ball rolling?

Clifford D. MayClifford D. May is an American journalist and editor. He is the president of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, a conservative policy institute created shortly after the 9/11 attacks, ...

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