The Corner

Culture

Friday links

The classic 1970 exploding whale video from the early days of the internet, and the Dave Barry column that made it famous.

An Italian village is selling homes for $1.25 so it doesn’t become a ghost town.

Watch Beetles Shoot Hot Chemicals From Their Butts to Escape Toad Bellies. This has to be a metaphor for something – discuss amongst yourselves.

Check out this 1861 Victorian sex manual – it’s chock full of useful information.

Alcohol Helps Clean Toxins From the Brain, Study Shows. This reminds me of the theory that alcohol thins the brain cell herd, as it were, by killing off the slower neurons and, therefore, contributing to the overall health of the herd. Not buying it. 

Kind of related to the above: Chemical found in McDonald’s fries may be cure for baldness, study finds. The new healthy diet – alcohol and McDonald’s fries. 

ICYMI, Monday’s links are here, and include the physics of sunsets, World Nutella Day (with a canonical list of Nutella recipes), the world’s oldest bottle of wine, NatGeo’s visit to the coldest city on earth, and the last photo taken of President Abraham Lincoln.

Most Popular

U.S.

How to Bend the News

This, from ABC, is a nice example of a news organization deliberately bending the truth in order to advance a narrative that it wishes were true but is not: Venerable gun manufacturer Colt says it will stop producing the AR-15, among other rifles, for the consumer market in the wake of many recent mass ... Read More
Elections

Story Time with David Brooks

His latest column imagines a future in which Elizabeth Warren wins the next presidential election. Warren won convincingly. The Democrats built a bigger majority in the House, and to general surprise, won a slim Senate majority of 52 to 48. After that election, the Republicans suffered a long, steady decline. ... Read More
Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Defaces Its Façade

The facade of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, designed by Richard Morris Hunt in 1902, contains four large niches that might display sculpture but have traditionally been left empty. This was prudent good taste on the Met's part, since sculpture on buildings is a tricky business that few artists in our age of ... Read More