The Corner

Gutfeld on the Rally

Wisdom from The Daily Gut:

So the Rally to Restore Sanity was good, clean, hip fun.

And, probably, unnecessary.

Which is why I did something necessary after watching it for thirty minutes: I hit the gym, and worked on the quads.

They look great, btw.

And that reminded me of my past, at Rodale – a health publishing company that put out Men’s Health, Prevention and Runners World. While I was an editor there, I was one of three or four conservatives, out of a company of 1300 people. The folks there were mostly young, cool and sinewy- just like the crazies I worked with while running Stuff and Maxim UK. Again, I was one of maybe, two nonlibs working and goofing off there.

My point: every single day of my life was a Jon Stewart rally. Everyone around me was pleasant, usually white, and always reveling in their reflexive assumptions about the “rest” of less hip America. Yep, they were my people when we got hammered. But because of my beliefs, I was not theirs on election day. And they’d hammer me for that.

That’s why when I watch the rally, I just wondered, who needs it?

Well, maybe to show a divide between two groups: The tea party was about candidates; The sanity rally was about celebrity.

More important, the tea party was a civilian reaction to our government’s sprint toward progressivism. The rally, however, was a celebrity reaction to those civilians.

The rally boiled down to: “we’re cool, you’re crazy.”

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