The Corner

High Noon Energy Debate on Friday 7th June

On Friday, National Review is sponsoring a “High Noon” debate in Washington, D.C. The topic is “The Energy Subsidy Experiment,” and the panelists are Thomas Pyle, of the American Energy Alliance, the Wall Street Journal’s Steve Moore, and Bob Dinneen, of the Renewable Fuels Association. I’ll be moderating. A fourth panelist will be added closer to the date. The blurb:

According to the Brookings Institution, the green energy sector is projected to receive $150 billion of taxpayer money through 2014. Despite annual deficits in excess of $1 trillion, the administration’s budget proposes to make many of these subsidies permanent, believing they are necessary to keep renewables competitive in the energy market and to spur job creation. Opponents contend these subsidies distort energy markets and merely shift the costs for renewables on to taxpayers. The High Noon Debate on Energy will examine the success of energy-related subsidies and the impact of government policy on long term job creation, energy security, and freely-functioning energy markets.

The event will be held on the 9th floor of 101 Constitution Ave NW Washington, DC 20001. Tickets are still available from here, and for those unable to get to Washington the event will be streamed live on NRO on Friday at noon.

Hope to see some of you there!

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