The Corner

Highlights of the Republican Spending Cuts Bill

The majority of the savings in the new $2.5 trillion spending cut bill introduced by the House Republican Study Committee today come in the form of reducing non-defense discretionary spending to FY 2008 levels through the remainder of 2011, and to 2006 levels from 2012-2021. Combined with eliminating automatic year-to-year inflation adjustments, that nets about $2.29 trillion over ten years. 

But there are a lot of smaller cuts in the bill that are notable. Some highlights:

– Reducing the federal workforce by 15 percent through attrition, and eliminating automatic pay increases for the next five years.

– Eliminating all remaining “stimulus” funding.  $45 billion

– Privatizing Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.  $30 billion

– Prohibiting any funding of the implementation — or legal defense — of Obamacare.

– Cutting the federal travel budget in half.  $7.5 billion annually

– Cutting the federal vehicle budget by 20 percent.  $600 million annually

– Eliminating the Corporation for Public Broadcasting subsidy.  $445 million annually 

– Eliminating Amtrak subsidies.  $1.565 billion annually

– Repealing Title X Family Planning.  $318 million annually

– Repealing the Davis-Bacon Act (which sets “prevailing wages” for workers on federal projects). $1 billion-plus annually

– Prohibiting taxpayer funded union activities by federal employees.  $1.2 billion savings over ten years 

And much more in there beside.

Daniel Foster — Daniel Foster is a former news editor of National Review Online.

Most Popular

Politics & Policy

The Beatification of Beto

The media’s treatment of Texas Democratic candidate Beto O’Rourke wasn’t the most egregiously unfair coverage of the past year -- that would be the treatment of Brett Kavanaugh -- but it ranks among 2018’s most annoying. The endless glowing profiles of O’Rourke in every publication from Vanity Fair to ... Read More
Elections

The Odds Are Slim to Nunes

When the history of the 2018 midterms is written, there will be a chapter on missed opportunities for Democrats. Some may wonder if they should have spent so much money supporting Beto O’Rourke in Texas, or whether Heidi Heitkamp was doomed from the start in North Dakota. One painful question for progressives ... Read More