The Corner

Politics & Policy

Hillary Clinton Is Even More Dishonest than You Thought

Today, the Friday before Labor Day, the FBI has released detailed interview notes from its investigation of Hillary Clinton’s email practices. The Washington Post says the notes don’t contain any “major revelations,” but it’s wrong. Very wrong. The notes reveal the stunning breadth of Hillary Clinton’s dishonesty and deception.

First, and most importantly, it’s plain that her team began systematically wiping the server only after news broke of its existence:

Second, her own response was extraordinarily cynical. Three weeks after she tweeted that she wanted the public to see her emails, the purge began. Publicly, she called for transparency. Privately, her team is frantically destroying messages:

Third, if you want further evidence of her extraordinary carelessness with our nation’s secrets, look no further than the fact that she claims that she did not pay attention to the “level” of classified information and even claimed that she didn’t even know what the (C) classification meant:

Finally — though this is a small matter by comparison — remember how Hillary claimed that she chose to use a private server for her own convenience? She actually had 13 devices, and her lawyers couldn’t seem to locate them:

Americans cannot believe a single word that comes out of Hillary Clinton’s mouth. She does what she wants, says whatever she needs to escape the news cycle (or federal prosecution), and proceeds right on with her march to power. Even worse, she’s consistently done so with the willing and enthusiastic participation and cooperation of the vast majority of the progressive media. As a colleague noted, where’s the “Against Hillary” edition of an esteemed liberal publication? 

Given the stunning incompetence and mendacity of her GOP opponent, this person is likely the next POTUS. After prolonged exposure to her corruption (which isn’t tempered by any of her husband’s charm or political talent), Americans will either be exhausted by the drama or so thoroughly hardened to dishonesty and scandal that our politics will be debased for a generation. She is the living symbol of the corruption of our elite and the rotting of our politics. May her reign be mercifully brief.

David French — David French is a senior writer for National Review, a senior fellow at the National Review Institute, and a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

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