The Corner

Politics & Policy

‘I Mean, I Would Crucify Her’

I can’t believe I’m typing these words, but the Washington Post has actually published a searing indictment of Hillary’s treatment of Bill Clinton’s mistresses. In a lengthy piece, it takes a look at Hillary’s responses to Gennifer Flowers, Paula Jones, and others. Some of the anecdotes are revealing – including this blast-from-the-past regarding Flowers:

“I think, by then [Bill’s presidential run], Hillary had a very good notion of Bill’s behavior,” said her longtime friend Nancy Pietrafesa. “Maybe she endured it, but I don’t think she condoned it.”

Nevertheless, Hillary Clinton dismissed an accusation made by Gennifer Flowers, the singer who sold her story to a supermarket tabloid after having previously denied an affair. In an ABC News interview, she called Flowers “some failed cabaret singer who doesn’t even have much of a résumé to fall back on.” She told Esquire magazine in 1992 that if she had the chance to cross-examine Flowers, “I mean, I would crucify her.”

Hillary’s remarks were not second-hand quotes from friends but rather quotes from actual news interviews. She was publicly vicious in her attacks against a woman who – it turns out – was telling the truth about an affair with her husband. And she was this vicious after she knew that Bill had been unfaithful in the past.

Then there’s this vignette, which reveals much about both Hillary and Bill:

[Clinton friend Jim] Blair said Hillary Clinton realized that the infidelities threatened more than their marriage. “Her idea, I think, was, if he’s going to be politically successful they have to become more conventional people who are more in tune with values of generations other than theirs,” Blair said.

Adultery hasn’t truly been fashionable in any American generation. It seems as if Bill’s commitment to fidelity – to the extent it has ever really existed – in based far more in political fear than in personal integrity.

For all the legitimate GOP anguish over nominating the one and only candidate in the main GOP field who is most vulnerable to Hillary, the Democratic elite should be feeling real shame for carrying Clinton over the finish line. After all, they nominated not just the worst standard-bearer for many of their most cherished PC ideals, they also nominated the one Democrat who may well lose to Trump.

David French is a senior writer for National Review, a senior fellow at the National Review Institute, and a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

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