The Corner

Politics & Policy

Hillary Clinton Says Sexual Assault Survivors Have the ‘Right To Be Believed’ — Does That Apply to Her Husband’s Alleged Victims?

Hillary had to know this was awkward, but modern conventions of political correctness now require liberal women to stand unequivocally behind alleged victims of sexual assault. So, here was Hillary on Monday: “To every survivor of sexual assault…You have the right to be heard. You have the right to be believed. We’re with you.”

That’s of course news to a number of women who Hillary not only refused to believe, she actively participated in campaigns to discredit them and destroy their reputations. From the Washington Post, here’s a partial list of women who’ve accused her husband of sexual assault or other illegal sexual conduct:

Paula Jones — A former Arkansas state employee who alleged that in 1991 Clinton, while governor, propositioned her and exposed himself. She later filed a sexual harassment suit, and it was during a deposition in that suit that Clinton initially denied having sexual relations with Lewinsky. Clinton in 1998 settled the suit for $850,000, with no apology or admission of guilt. All but $200,000 was directed to pay legal fees.

Juanita Broaddrick — The nursing home administrator emerged after the impeachment trial to allege that 21 years earlier Clinton had raped her. Clinton flatly denied the claim, and there were inconsistencies in her story. No charges were ever brought.

Kathleen Willey — The former White House aide claimed Clinton groped her in his office in 1993, on the same day when her husband, facing embezzlement charges, died in an apparent suicide. (Her story changed over time. During a deposition in the Paula Jones matter, she initially said she had no recollection about whether Clinton kissed her and insisted he did not fondle her.) Clinton denied her account, and the independent prosecutor concluded “there is insufficient evidence to prove to a jury beyond a reasonable doubt that President Clinton’s testimony regarding Kathleen Willey was false.” Willey later began to claim Clinton had a hand in her husband’s death, even though her husband left behind a suicide note.

As the Post notes, there have been other — less notorious — allegations against Clinton as well:

One woman was alleged to have been asked by Clinton to give him oral sex in a car while he was the state attorney general (a claim she denied). A former Arkansas state employee said that during a presentation, then-Governor Clinton walked behind her and rubbed his pelvis up against her repeatedly. A woman identified as a third cousin of Clinton’s supposedly told her drug counselor during treatment in Arkansas that she was abused by Clinton when she was baby-sitting at the Governor’s Mansion in Little Rock.

Since it’s an article of faith on the Left that only 2 to 8 percent of rape allegations are false, Hillary’s husband is either an amateur version of Bill Cosby or one of the unluckiest men alive.

But of course Hillary’s statement is patent nonsense, and she knows it. Women do not have a right to be believed. They do have a right to be heard, to present their case in court. And the accused has a right to a presumption of innocence — regardless of whether that accused is Bill Clinton or a fraternity pledge at Ohio State. It is shameful enough for Hillary to jump on the campus rape crisis bandwagon — a movement that is comprehensively violating core constitutional rights from coast to coast — and it is doubly shameful given her political machine’s longtime treatment of the women who’ve made accusations against her own husband. 

David French is a senior writer for National Review, a senior fellow at the National Review Institute, and a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

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