The Corner

Immigration Absconders

Anyone concerned about immigration should read a guest column in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution by my former Justice Department colleague Mark Metcalf, a former immigration judge who was in the heart of the federal immigration-enforcement process.

He points out that in its 2008 annual report, the Department of Homeland Security reported that “558,000 fugitive aliens — those who fled court or disobeyed order to leave — had avoided removal.” Despite the Obama administration’s claims about stepped up enforcement:

[T]his number has grown. Some 715,000 people now reside in the U.S. that DHS refuses to deport. In one year, unenforced deportation orders have climbed 28 percent. And the numbers keep climbing.

According to Mark, millions of illegal immigrants can avoid deportation because “DHS declines to enforce valid removal orders, discourages routine police reports and dismisses cases it was prosecuting.” Even worse, Mark says, the Justice Department has been misrepresenting the numbers reported to Congress about the aliens handled by the administrative immigration courts. In 2009, for example, Justice claimed “only 11 percent of aliens dodged court” when, in fact, “32 percent of aliens disappeared before trial.”

What we discover about the federal government’s handling of the immigration-enforcement problem just gets worse every day.

Hans A. von Spakovsky — Heritage Foundation – As a Senior Legal Fellow and Manager of the Election Law Reform Initiative in the Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, Hans von Spakovsky concentrates on voting, ...

Most Popular

Culture

Let Alfie Evans Go to Rome

Alfie Evans, 23 months old, is hospitalized with a rare neurodegenerative disorder. Against his parents’ wishes, his doctors at Alder Hey Hospital in Liverpool removed him from life support on Monday evening, maintaining that further treatment would be futile. Bambino Gesù Pediatric Hospital in Rome has ... Read More
Education

Is Journalism School Worth It?

Clarence Darrow dropped out of law school after just a year, figuring that he would learn what he needed to know about legal practice faster if he were actually doing it than sitting in classrooms. (Today, that wouldn't be possible, thanks to licensing requirements.) The same thing is true in other fields -- ... Read More
Culture

Wednesday Links

Today is ANZAC Day, the anniversary of the Battle of Gallipoli: Here's some history, a documentary, and a Lego re-enactment. How DNA Can Lead to Wrongful Convictions: Labs today can identify people with DNA from just a handful of cells, but a handful of cells can easily migrate. The 19th-century art of ... Read More
World

Microscopic Dots. Let’s Look at Them.

Stuart E. Eizenstat has written a big book on the Carter presidency. (Eizenstat was Carter’s chief domestic-policy adviser. He also had a substantial hand in foreign affairs.) I have reviewed the book for the forthcoming NR. Eizenstat tells the story of a meeting between President Carter and Andrei Gromyko, the ... Read More
Law & the Courts

Alfie and Haleigh and Charlie and Jahi

When British hospital officials tried to pull the plug on 23-month-old toddler Alfie Evans on Monday night in arrogant defiance of his parents' wishes, many Americans took to Twitter to count their blessings that they live in a country that would not allow such tyranny. "Stories like Alfie Evans make me ... Read More