The Corner

Indiana GOP Pulls Right-to-Work Bill

Indiana Republicans are pulling back a labor bill that so upset statehouse Democrats that it sent them to Illinois. But call the Dems mint jelly, because they’re still on the lam:

. . .the Democrats said they’re not returning to Indiana for now.

Republican House Speaker Brian Bosma said the so-called right-to-work legislation is dead and will not be reintroduced during this session of the Indiana House. Democrats felt so strongly about that bill that they went to Urbana, Ill., Tuesday so that Republicans couldn’t achieve a quorum to vote on the bill.

Republicans in the House of Representatives hold a 60-40 majority. But they cannot pass a bill without a quorum of two-thirds, or 67 representatives. By leaving, Democrats deprived them of the quorum and placed themselves out of the reach of Indiana state troopers who might otherwise physically retrieve them and bring them back to the House session.

John Schorg, a spokesman for the Democratic legislators, said that despite Mr. Bosma’s statements, “Forgive us if we aren’t trusting.” Republican leaders, he said, had once promised not to introduce the labor bill before doing so.

More here.

Daniel Foster — Daniel Foster is a former news editor of National Review Online.

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