The Corner

National Review

Inside the December 22, 2019, Issue

The cover date is December 22, 2019, and the cover boy is South Bend, Indiana’s li’l mayor Pete Buttigieg, the Democratic presidential hopeful and subject of a Kyle Smith profile (read it here) that sizes him up as all hat and no cattle, the arrogance-oozing Millennial “Credential Man.” It’s not a piece you will want to miss.

Nor is anything else that’s printed between the covers. You can read everything, from The Week to Happy Warrior (this edition feature David Harsanyi’s memories of NYC’s once-dirty streets, cleaned by liberals, and now returning to squalor under their grandchildren’s watch), without restriction if you subscribe to NRPLUS. You’re limited (very!) if you don’t. So let’s suggest three other worthwhile pieces that will get you to (but not through) that limit: There is Jay Nordlinger’s catch-up with Purdue University president Mitch Daniels, Barry Latzer’s assessment of the battle over the lefty-bugaboo’d term “black-on-black,” as applied to crime, and Kevin Williamson’s profile of another big-city mayor who fancies himself POTUS: billionaire Nanny-Statist Michael Bloomberg. Read all those pieces and more, in this new issue, in our magazine archives, right now with NRPLUS.

And if you have in mind some other folks who should be reading these gems of conservative wisdom, well, why not let the season’s mood take over: Send them NR gift subscriptions.

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