The Corner

National Review

Inside the November 16, 2020, Issue of National Review

The November 16, 2020, issue is out, and has a bevy of wonderful articles that bring sunshine and wit and wisdom your way. The physical National Review magazine itself is in the mail, winding its way towards the homes of subscribers, but there is no wait for NRPLUS members (are you one? If not then remedy that right here). We’ll take this opportunity to recommend some of the contents, and of course the best place to start is with the cover essay, penned by Charles C. W. Cooke, about his adopted and beloved home state of Florida (per Charlie: it’s “a fabulous place to live — and, moreover, far from being an eccentric backwater, it is a compelling, important, and up-and-coming part of the United States of America, filled with interesting and capable people from all walks of life.”). The other major pieces (“two-column” is the in-house descriptive lingo) following it are Naomi Schaefer Riley’s truly important essay making the case for foster-care reform, Scott Winship’s piece arguing that widespread, at-home COVID testing is vital for restoring America, and Vivek Ramaswamy’s smart essay exploring the diversity that defines every individual.

Since we’re in a sunny mood, here are two more recommendations: Jay Nordlinger finds things lively at a cemetery, while in the Books, Arts & Manners section, David Mamet offers a wonderful reflection on the intelligencia-hold by the New York Muscovites (“Eastern European Jewish Americans, brought up on the 1930s socialism and free love”) who were so influential in theater.

Do remember that if you are not an NRPLUS member, you get but three monthly cracks at articles we’ve designated as exclusive — which applies to all magazine pieces. So, do get that subscription (heck, there’s a big sale going on right now).

Recommended

The Latest