The Corner

National Security & Defense

ISIS’s New ‘Jihadi John’ ID’d as Former Bounce House Salesman

Well, that explains Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s new residence:

The masked militant in an Islamic State video showing the killing of five men accused by the group of being Western spies is believed to be a Londoner known as Sid who once sold inflatable bounce houses.

Siddhartha Dhar, who left Britain for Syria while on police bail after his arrest on suspicion of belonging to a banned group and encouraging terrorism, has been identified by media as the spokesman in the militant organization’s latest film. . . .

Dhar, who is also known as Abu Rumaysah, is one of Britain’s most high-profile Islamists and an associate of Anjem Choudary, Britain’s best-known Islamist preacher, who is due to go on trial next week accused of terrorism offenses. [via NY Post]

Apparently, it was the background in the latest video that tipped sources off: 

You know, if ISIS is interested, there are some Americans who are pretty good with blow-ups, too.

Ian Tuttle — Ian Tuttle is the former Thomas L. Rhodes Journalism Fellow at the National Review Institute.

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