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If this sounds like gushing, it should be because I am.

I’m still feeling the warm effects of an event in New York City last week: a symposium about my new book, Ball of Collusion. The evening evolved into a live-audience episode of The McCarthy Report, our weekly podcast, in which Rich Lowry and I discuss legal and national-security issues, usually focusing on the investigations — law-enforcement, counterintelligence, and congressional — arising out of Russia’s supposed interference in the 2016 presidential campaign.

That is, the evening blossomed into what you come to National Review for: news and analysis of the pressing issues of our day. This includes the opportunity for real exchanges between people who are part of a community, where writers and editors share what we think and where we get invaluable feedback from our audience, which isn’t made up of subscribers and website browsers but fellow members of the movement, allies in the conservative cause.

Happily, for this kind of experience, you don’t need to wait for the writers you love to read and critique to crank out another book. You can join NRPLUS.

NRPLUS is the community for National Review members. Fond as we are of subscribers, we think of NRPLUS as much more. Like a subscriber, you get full access — digitally, both on the website and on the NR app — to our fortnightly magazine, the venerable beacon of the conservative movement launched by our founder, William F. Buckley Jr., in 1955. But you also get the benefits of full-fledged participants in our cause, such as invitations to exclusive National Review events. Maybe it’s Kevin Williamson on the crossroads of economics and poetry, Charlie Cooke on why we venerate the Constitution, Jay Nordlinger on the never-ending struggle for freedom, John Miller on what you should be reading, or Ramesh Ponnuru on, well, everything. Maybe it’s Kyle Smith, Alexandra DeSanctis, or David French on the culture; Jim Geraghty, John Fund, or John McCormack on national politics; John O’Sullivan or Michael Brendan Dougherty on Brexit; or the ancients and the founders brought to life by Victor Davis Hanson or Rick Brookhiser. Or maybe it’s a visit from Karl Rove, Paul Ryan, or another of the key policymakers who’ve been in the hot seat trying to implement conservative policies in the governance of a complex and sharply divided society.

Times are changing, in the media and the movement. NRPLUS is the future. It is the National Review you’ve always relied on as the light in the heat, but in a more enriching, multi-faceted, interactive platform. We rely on you in order to do what we do, and in return, we are trying to give you not just the best product in conservative thought but an opportunity to shape it, enriching all of us and the movement by what you bring to our table.

Please join NRPLUS. Join our community.

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