The Corner

Limbaugh & McCarthy

From yesterday’s Rush Limbaugh Show

Andy, as a lawyer and as somebody who’s worked in the Justice Department, you’re very much aware of it power US attorneys offices have: the attorney general, the DOJ.  You look at these people from Holder down and the way that they’re conducting business, what are your fears?  This just seems like the tip of the iceberg here with the dichotomy or the feint, if you will, with the way Demjanjuk might be treated. And yet we want to destroy the lives of American lawyers who authored the very same belief system that they’re going to use to extradite Demjanjuk.  What else is going on that people may not know about?

McCARTHY:  Well, my biggest fear, Rush, is that we’re having a repeat of what we saw in the 1990s, particularly with the “wall” regulations, which were a set of internal Justice Department guidelines that prevented the national security side of the FBI’s house from communicating with criminal investigators and prosecutors like me.  Those regulations created an ethos, a philosophy within the government that there were things that were more important than the national security of the United States, and making sure the left hand knew what the right hand was doing so that we could figure out what the threats were against us.  And the feeling that it put in people throughout the government was that if you tried to do your job — if you tried to push the envelope, if you tried to protect the American people, if you tried to go the extra mile to figure out what the threats against us were — that could be professionally ruinous for you.  And we saw where that led on 9/11.  I don’t, frankly, think it should have taken until 9/11 to figure it out because we were attacked repeatedly from 1993 going forward. And I think in terms of… You know, look. What difference does it make to somebody like me or to John Yoo or to Bybee? You know, you can ruin one lawyer or three lawyers or however many lawyers.  The important thing to those of us who care about the country is, we need to have the government, as we’ve seen, given the threat that we’re up against, moving heaven and earth to figure out what the threats are against us, to figure out where the next place we might get hit is.

RUSH:  Excuse me.  I get the distinct impression this administration does not think of that threat as serious at all.

McCARTHY:  Well, they rhetorically suggest that it’s serious but certainly if you look at what they’re doing compared to what they’re saying, I have to agree that you’re right.

RUSH:  Well, I don’t know how you… That’s the whole point with Obama.  He says all these wonderful things, like we’re going to have a chance to track every dollar of the stimulus bill, at Recovery.org.  Then we learn today that the site’s not going to have any worthy data until next year, and it’s not even going to have to it then. It’s all a joke!  While he talks about protecting the country and so forth, he’s making deals with Hamas, selling Israel out.  He’s got John Kerry out saying to Iran, “Hey, look, we’re going to change our policy on regime change. We’ll accept you; we’ll tolerate you — if you guys just get rid and suspend your nuclear program.”  These are fools.  They have to know that Ahmadinejad, the Iranians, are not going to accept this, even if they said they would.

McCARTHY:  Well, you make a great point, and you raised before the letter that I sent last week.  Another reason that I didn’t want to go to this confab on Monday was because I thought essentially it’s a charade. It’s sort of the difference between what they’re doing and what they’re saying that you’ve just outlined.  They’re contending, or they’re telling people, that they’re studying carefully all the issues about detainees.  And yet what we’re finding is that they’re actually releasing detainees.  About four weeks ago they released a guy outright named Binyam Mohamed who was sent back to England.  He’s the collaborator with Jose Padilla, the guy that was the so-called dirty bomber.  He was actually planning mass murder attacks in American cities.  He was held as an enemy combatant for about six years by the Bush administration.  The Obama administration has just released him to England.  So for all this arguing about, you know, “Should we do it in the criminal justice system or should we do it in the military system?” You could argue that all day long but I don’t think anybody thought we should be releasing these guys, and yet that’s what they did with him and it’s what they’re planning to go with these guys, the Uighurs, who they’re actually talking about releasing into the United States.

More here.

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