The Corner

Medicare

My brief and glancing foray into policy wonkery begins thus, in today’s column :

Full-time political junkies are often criticized for their cynicism. We’re too blasé, too dismissive of idealism, ideas, hope and plain old do-goodery. There’s merit to this complaint, and I would have more sympathy for it if Washington were not a cesspool of intellectual reprobates and rent-seeking whorishness. There’s a reason the golden spirit of the high-school overachiever (“and if we all work together, we can make this the best yearbook ever!”) turns to dross in this fetid swamp of institutionalized asininity.

Take, for a timely example, Medicare Part D, a.k.a. the prescription-drug benefit. If Washington is a sausage factory, then this is surely the most jumbo of wieners…

Jonah Goldberg — Jonah Goldberg is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a senior editor of National Review. His new book, The Suicide of The West, will be released on April 24.

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