The Corner

More Brickbats for Jindal

Bobby Jindal’s signing of that Louisiana Science Education Act is getting him some broadsides from the life-sciences community. One of their online magazines, TheScientist.com (there’s a free registration rigmarole) has a piece by Michael Stebbins, the Director of Biology Policy at the Federation of American Scientists. It includes the following interesting bit of hypocrisy on Jindal’s part that I have not seen noted elsewhere.

Few took notice of a provision in the bill that gives the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education unprecedented power to prohibit materials approved by local school boards. This is a politically appointed board and the bill provides no guidelines for making such Draconian decisions. This runs completely counter to the conservative principles Jindal cited in supporting the bill. In [his] Face the Nation interview, he stated his philosophy, “I don’t think that this [teaching evolution in schools] is something that federal or state governments should be imposing its views on local districts. You know, as a conservative, I think that government that is closest to the people governs best. I think local school boards should be in the position of deciding their curricula and also deciding what students should be learning.” He has now signed a law that gives unprecedented powers to the state over local school boards — hypocritical on most days.

John Derbyshire — Mr. Derbyshire is a former contributing editor of National Review.

Most Popular

White House

For Democrats, the Party’s Over

If the Democrats are really tempted by impeachment, bring it on. Since the day after the 2016 election they have been threatening this, placing their chips on the Russian-collusion fantasy and then on the phantasmagoric charade of obstruction of justice. The attorney general accurately gave the ingredients of the ... Read More
Elections

The 24 Democrats

Every presidential primary ends with one winner and a lot of losers. Some might argue that one or two once-little-known candidates who overperform low expectations get to enjoy a form of moral victory. (Ben Carson and Rick Perry might be happy how the 2016 cycle ended, with both taking roles in Trump’s cabinet. ... Read More