The Corner

More, More, More!

One of the most popular teachers at Hillsdale College is English professor Stephen Smith. This Friday evening, he speaks on Thomas More, the patron of statesmen, at the college’s Kirby Center in Washington, D.C. (across the street from the Heritage Foundation):

A man in full and a man for our season, Thomas More (1478-1535) has intrigued generations of writers and thinkers, citizens and statesmen alike. William Shakespeare, for example, wrote of More as living justice “for truth’s sake and his conscience,” while Jonathan Swift numbered Thomas More among the six greatest defenders of liberty and claimed that More was “the person of the greatest virtue these islands ever produced.” In the twentieth century, Winston Churchill admired “the noble and heroic stand” of More’s last years, and GK Chesterton wrote that More “may come to be counted the greatest Englishman, or at least the greatest historical character in English history.” How did one free and educated man make an impact like this, on his own country and across the centuries, such that he would be canonized on the eve of the second world war, named Lawyer of the Millennium in 1999, and finally proclaimed Patron of Statesmen at the beginning of the third millennium? This talk will offer ten counsels from Thomas More on statesmanship and the needs of the present moment.

John J. Miller is the national correspondent for National Review and the director of the Dow Journalism Program at Hillsdale College. His new book is Reading Around: Journalism on Authors, Artists, and Ideas.

Most Popular

Sports

It’s Time for Colin Kaepernick to Move On

Colin Kaepernick. Remember him? Below-average quarterback. Above-average poseur. Not “activist,” not really. Activists actually say stuff. Kaepernick almost never says anything. He’s like the Queen or most popes — you have to read the deep-background musings of supposed members of his inner circle to get ... Read More
Elections

Trump and the Black Vote

"Donald Trump is a racist, white supremacist, white nationalist. So are his supporters." Some version of that refrain is heard almost hourly somewhere in mainstream media. Democratic politicians seem to proclaim it more often than that. Listening only to the Left, you'd conclude that more than half a ... Read More
U.S.

The Age of Miscalculation

On August 7, 1998, more than 200 people were killed in terrorist attacks on U.S. embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi, Kenya. Americans learned three names most of them never had heard before: Ayman al-Zawahiri, Osama bin Laden, and al-Qaeda. On August 20, 1998, President Bill Clinton ordered a ... Read More