The Corner

MSNBC: ‘Shouldn’t We Also Have Freedom From People Who Have Guns?’

I love this “What about my freedom from guns?” theme that pops up in conversation from time to time. It’s so brilliantly illiterate. The claim to “freedom from guns” inevitably negates the freedom to own guns. Try it with speech: “Sure, you have the right to say whatever you wish, but what about my right not to be offended?” is a nonsensical question that serves only as a less threatening way of advocating censorship, and dresses advocacy for government control in the language of individual rights. Beyond the (important, attendant) right not to have a gun if they don’t want one — nobody is suggesting mandates — Americans have no right whatsoever to prevent others from exercising their basic liberties. Your freedom from guns is the same as my freedom from MSNBC: If you don’t like it, don’t buy the product.

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History

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History

Thanksgiving Is Not a Lie

We live in a time of heedless iconoclasm, and so one of the country’s oldest traditions is under assault. Thanksgiving is increasingly portrayed as, at best, based on falsehoods and, at worst, a whitewash of genocide against Native Americans. The New York Times ran a piece the other day titled, “The ... Read More
Culture

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Culture

On Being Grateful

My mother always enjoyed making Thanksgiving dinner. She took a traditional Southern woman’s pride in being a good cook, following her mother’s recipes, and my family made a rare display of kindness by declining to inform her that she was a fairly dreadful cook, one whose kitchen alchemy on the electric range ... Read More
U.S.

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U.S.

Gratitude: What We Owe to Our Country

Editor’s Note: The following essay by National Review founder William F. Buckley comes from the first chapter of his 1990 book, Gratitude: Reflections on What We Owe to Our Country. I have always thought Anatole France’s story of the juggler to be one of enduring moral resonance. This is the arresting and ... Read More