The Corner

National Review

A Tale of Two Cruises

MS Zaandam (Wikimedia)

We are offering our friends and readers two excellent sea- and river-faring opportunities in the upcoming months. The more proximate (in time and location) is NR’s 2019 Canada/New England Conservative Cruise. It sails August 24–31, from Montreal to Boston, on Holland America Line’s beautiful Zaandam, and will visit Quebec City, Halifax, Charlottetown, Sydney, and Bar Harbor, plus sail the beautiful Saint Lawrence River and Gulf. It’s a great group of speakers — to which we have just added Mark Janus, the man whose principled diligence led to the profound 2018 Supreme Court decision (yeah, that Janus) that broadened the free-speech protection of government workers who for decades had been forced to pay dues and fees that bankrolled liberal union political activity. Mark joins Peter Schweizer, Jeff Sessions, Cleta Mitchell, John O’Sullivan, Rich Lowry, Charlie Cooke, Fr. Robert Sirico, Brian Anderson, Jay Nordlinger, Christina Hoff Summers, Kathryn Jean Lopez, Kevin Williamson, Alexandra DeSanctis, and other National Review editors and writers. Prices start at only $2,499 a person, and there will be seminars, receptions, dining nightly with our speakers, and all that on top of a smashing sailing. Get complete information, and reserve your stateroom, at www.nrcruise.com.

Now here is the second cruise — although it’s not so much a cruise as it is a riverboat voyage, one that will be très bon. It’s a tentative thing that we expect a few more people will make . . . un-tentative. I speak, in a lousy attempt at riddling, of the (possible!) National Review 2020 Rhine River Charter Voyage. This will be a charter trip of 140 passengers on AMA Waterways elegant AmaMora. Scheduled for April 19–26, it commences in Basel, Switzerland, churns up (or is it down?) the historic Rhine, through its wondrous locks, past castles and hamlets and vineyards, headed toward Amsterdam, along the way visiting Strasbourg, Cologne, Rudesheim, Lahnstein, Breisach, and Ludwigshafen.

Speakers? Well, we’ve got invites out, but so far are happy to announce that Rich Lowry, John O’Sullivan, David Pryce-Jones, Amity Shlaes, Seth Lipsky, Charles Kesler, and Sally Pipes will be with us. For seminars, receptions, tours, dining — this will be a terrific week. Will you join us?

We have until June 15 to decide to formally charter the AmaMora, so if you wish to be part of this once-in-a-lifetime trip, do register now (knowing, if there is no commitment, that you will be out nada). Get complete information about available cabins (many have already been reserved) and prices, and much more, at nrcruise.com/rhine.

Members of the National Review editorial and operational teams are included under the umbrella “NR Staff.”

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