The Corner

Publisher Announcement

Central to publishing, and to the National Review mission of spreading conservatism to as many people as possible, is new media. Paper and ink still matter. But less so now than does your iPhone.

Garrett Bewkes, a new-media expert most recently at the New York Post, joined National Review in late 2016 to assume the duty of overhauling our business operations so that they sync with this reality, to improve NR’s bottom line, and to increase its influence and consequence.

Now the Associate Publisher, as hard working as he is knowledgeable, Garrett will become National Review’s sixth Publisher on February 1. 

I, the current Publisher, will become National Review’s Vice President, maintaining a broad array of responsibilities in development, fundraising, publicity, print, and relations with our beloved subscribers, readers, donors, and friends.

These necessary changes, instigated by me in a process that began in earnest in 2015, will enhance National Review’s future and influence, and help us better embrace the responsibilities and fulfill the duties that Bill Buckley entrusted to us.

We envision an exceptional and friendly website. And many more readers. And much less red ink.

Applying for a summer internship, I first walked through the doors of 150 East 35th Street in January 1981. Some 25 years later, I became Publisher. I appreciate deeply the trust placed in me by my friend, our founder, and by my predecessor, and also dear friend, Ed Capano. The same goes for Rich Lowry, Dusty Rhodes, John Hillen, Jim Kilbridge, and so many other exceptional men and women who were colleagues during my tenure, and others, such as Christopher Buckley, Brian Murdock, and Robert Agostinelli, who have been sources of strength and wisdom.

I look forward to working with Rich, Garrett, Lindsay Craig, and the great NR and National Review Institute teams as we achieve our objectives, as we fulfill Bill Buckley’s mission, as we enhance his legacy, and as we spread the consequential wisdom of National Review’s conservatism to millions more Americans.

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