The Corner

NOW President Links Hobby Lobby Ruling to Apartheid, Jim Crow

The Supreme Court’s ruling in favor of protecting religious freedom for private business owners is on par with arguments favoring race-based segregation in South Africa and the United States in the past, according to National Organization for Women president Terry O’Neill.

“I think it’s really important to remember apartheid in South Africa was justified on religious grounds; the Southern Baptist Convention justified slavery, and later Jim Crow and segregation, on religious grounds,” O’Neill said on MSNBC on Monday. “There are some religious beliefs we no longer honor in our government, and the Supreme Court is simply wrong to honor gender bigotry that Hobby Lobby stores and Conestoga Wood are promoting.”

“It’s bigotry to keep women away from having basic health care,” she added.

Later, columnist Connie Schultz also lamented the Court’s ruling. “As a Christian, I am so offended by the notion that to be a Christian means you want to harm women,” she said.

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