The Corner

NPR! NPR! NPR!

Reporters on the environmental beat are, in most times and most places, little more than PR flacks for organized environmental lobbies and I have long given up any expectation that what I hear or read in the mainstream media will represent anything close to a straight story. Hence, you could have knocked me over with a feather — a feather! — this morning when, driving to work, I heard this story on NPR’s Morning Edition about how enviro jihadis crusading against PVC (a kind of plastic) are out to lunch . . . at least, if the science on these matters is to be believed. At issue; a law adopted last year to ban phthalates in children’s toys. 

Two lessons can be found here. Lesson 1: Sanctimonious cries by the Democratic Left that “sound science” has been exiled by the Republicans only to be triumphantly returned under Democratic rule are a load of nonsense. Lesson 2: There are still a few reporters out there — even in liberal media bastions like NPR — who dare to question the party line.

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