The Corner

National Review

You Could Be a Most Happy Fella (if You Apply by December 15th)

That’s what you will be if you become part of this remarkably enjoyable National Review Institute program. NRI is seeking applicants for its Spring 2019 Regional Fellowship Programs in New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C.

Who/what/when/where/why, you ask? Fair enough: The ideal applicant will be a mid-career professional (roughly ages 30–50), with an interest, but not professional experience, in policy or journalism. Past Fellows have represented diverse industries and professions ranging from oil and gas, finance, real estate, medicine, sporting industries, law enforcement, education, nonprofits, and the arts. The program takes place over eight moderated dinner discussions (always at a classy joint). The 2019 class will run from January through May. Each session is moderated, and there is a curriculum. Moderators include popular writers at National Review and leading academics at local universities. The rewards of participating are plentiful and last a lifetime. The deadline to apply is December 15. To do that, and to find more information about the Regional Fellows Program here. And if you don’t live in one of the three program cities, but know folks who do (maybe there is a kid in Philly, a grandkid in Brooklyn, a niece or nephew in Georgetown) and who might be NRI fellow material, please share this with them.

Become a Fellow. Think about it while you listen to the original cast album of Frank Loesser’s 1955 classic musical, The Most Happy Fella.

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