The Corner

Obama on Dem Senate Candidates: ‘These Are All Folks Who Vote With Me’

President Obama handed another useful sound bite to Republicans for the last few weeks of the campaign season, boasting today that Democrats running in states where he’s unpopular are still fervent supporters of his.

“A lot of the states that are contested this [fall] are states that I didn’t win,” the president said in an interview on Al Sharpton’s radio show. “And so some of the candidates there, you know, it is difficult for them to have me in the state because the Republicans will use that to try to fan Republican turnout. The bottom line is, though, these are all folks who vote with me — they have supported my agenda in Congress.”

“This isn’t about my feelings being hurt. These are folks who are strong allies and supporters of me,” the president continued. “And I tell them, I said, you know what, you do what you need to win. I will be responsible for making sure that our voters turn up.”

A number of Democratic Senate candidates are running in red states that never voted for the president, or states where he’s now unpopular, such as Colorado and Iowa, and they haven’t, as the president said, been eager to have him join them on the campaign trail. Incumbent Democratic senators, even as they’ve tried to distance themselves from Obama, have also been hit with ads pointing out that they vote with the president’s position 90-plus percent of the time. Meanwhile, a number of Senate candidates, including Kentucky’s Alison Lundergan Grimes, have dodged questions about whether they even voted for the president in previous elections.

This isn’t the first time the president has yoked Democratic candidates to himself and his agenda: A couple weeks ago, he told an audience that voters should remember his “policies are on the ballot, every single one of them.”

Patrick Brennan — Patrick Brennan is a writer and policy analyst based in Washington, D.C. He was Director of Digital Content for Marco Rubio's presidential campaign, writing op-eds, policy content, and leading the ...

Most Popular

White House

The Trivialization of Impeachment

We have a serious governance problem. Our system is based on separation of powers, because liberty depends on preventing any component of the state from accumulating too much authority -- that’s how tyrants are born. For the system to work, the components have to be able to check each other: The federal and ... Read More
Elections

Put Up or Shut Up on These Accusations, Hillary

Look, one 2016 candidate being prone to wild and baseless accusations is enough. Appearing on Obama campaign manager David Plouffe’s podcast, Hillary Clinton suggested that 2016 Green Party candidate Jill Stein was a “Russian asset,” that Republicans and Russians were promoting the Green Party, and ... Read More
U.S.

‘Texodus’ Bodes Badly for Republicans

‘I am a classically trained engineer," says Representative Will Hurd, a Texas Republican, "and I firmly believe in regression to the mean." Applying a concept from statistics to the randomness of today's politics is problematic. In any case, Hurd, 42, is not waiting for the regression of our politics from the ... Read More
Culture

Feminists Have Turned on Pornography

Since the sexual revolution of the 1960s, the feminist movement has sought to condemn traditional sexual ethics as repressive, misogynistic, and intolerant. As the 2010s come to a close, it might be fair to say that mainstream culture has reached the logical endpoint of this philosophy. Whereas older Americans ... Read More
PC Culture

Defiant Dave Chappelle

When Dave Chappelle’s Netflix special Sticks & Stones came out in August, the overwhelming response from critics was that it was offensive, unacceptable garbage. Inkoo Kang of Slate declared that Chappelle’s “jokes make you wince.” Garrett Martin, in the online magazine Paste, maintained that the ... Read More