The Corner

Odd Stuff

A writer at The New Republic seems to think the right’s backlash against Ed Klein’s book is entirely the product of a movement-wide conspiracy:

… even as The Truth About Hillary bounds up the best-seller lists, the right has rallied around a collective cry of foul play. The question is why. The book is, of course, a masterwork of personal attack, full of anonymous sniping and vile insinuation. But Klein’s tome relies heavily on past Hillary character assassinations–most notably, Dick Morris’s Rewriting History–and the rest mostly reprises old complaints about the former first lady. The outrage emanating from the right hardly seems attributable to the rather unremarkable trashiness of this volume. More likely, conservatives are launching a preemptive strike on what Klein identifies as one of Clinton’s central mantras–”victimhood can be a political plus.” Piling on Hillary now, particularly over a collection of unsubstantiated trifles, would merely advance theories of her old chestnut, the vast right-wing conspiracy. Rushing to Hillary’s defense would seem to be a canny strategy both to prevent her from building up too much public sympathy and to assert the intellectual honesty of the American right. But it could also turn out to be a major miscalculation.

Me:So, the conservatives are acting like a vast-right-wing conspiracy in order to avoiding confirming its existence? So why did Tony Blankley love the book? Did he miss the conference call?

Jonah Goldberg — Jonah Goldberg is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a senior editor of National Review. His new book, The Suicide of The West, will be released on April 24.

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