The Corner

Old Europe

This is why I’m opposed to universal social programs – because they were set up on the basis of mid-20th century birth rates. So, to mark the impending first anniversary of my book on the subject, here’s the umpteenth story in the year since on Europe’s accelerating demographic death spiral:

There are currently more elderly people than children living in the EU, as Europe’s young population has decreased by 21 percent – or 23 million — in 25 years, 10 percent of which in the last ten years alone…

Italy has the least young people (14.2%) and one out of every five Italians is more than 65 years old… However, the decrease in numbers has been greatest in Spain, where the young population has diminished by 44% in the 1990 to 2005 period…

The decrease has been most significant in new member state Bulgaria, which has lost almost 8% of its population (7.94%) in the last ten years…

On top of that, the number of births across the EU has been decreasing and in some member states, the birth rate is almost two times lower than in the US (2.09 children per family in 2006)…

Etc. The silliest response (aside from the bottom-fixated ones) I received re the Frost kerfuffle was from a professor at the University of Connecticut business school, who wrote:

I’d also suggest you check some of the more recent data regarding “Europe’s terminal enervation.”

I’ve checked the data, professor. Why don’t you try it? Greek public pensions liabilities is a fun place to start.

Mark Steyn — Mark Steyn is an international bestselling author, a Top 41 recording artist, and a leading Canadian human-rights activist. That’s to say, his latest book, After America (2011), is a top-five bestseller in ...

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