The Corner

Is This One Tsarnaev Brother’s Amazon Wish List?

This could well be the Amazon gift registry of one of the brothers who are now suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing — 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was killed last night:

Couple caveats: Tamerlan is a very common name across Central Asia (or at least, it and all its permutations are), but the connections are uncanny: There are, as you can see, books about document forgery and voice concealment, in addition to the canonical works on the fall of the Roman empire — Islamist terrorists, including Osama bin Laden, have been known to speak of the U.S. as a “new Rome.” It’s not exactly clear how an interest in organized crime and the Mafia would have fit in, though maybe the Tsarnaev brothers had some delusions about gathering funds via some kind of crime in the U.S., and were reading up on the experts.

One bizarre bit is the Chechen phrasebook — the brothers came to the U.S. when they were 7 and 14 years old, and presumably were ensconced in a Chechen-immigration community, so it does seem rather odd for them to be interested in a book that teaches them their own mother tongue.

Patrick BrennanPatrick Brennan is a writer and policy analyst based in Washington, D.C. He was Director of Digital Content for Marco Rubio's presidential campaign, writing op-eds, policy content, and leading the ...

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