The Corner

Palin Urges Americans to Remember Haiti

Visiting Haiti this weekend, Sarah Palin talked about how Americans need to remember the earthquake-ravaged country.

“I do urge Americans not to forget Haiti,” Palin said, according to the Associated Press.

Palin, joined by husband Todd, daughter Bristol, and Fox News host Greta Van Susteren on the trip, was accompanying Franklin Graham’s Samaritan’s Purse organization, which has worked to help the country after the devastation of the earthquake.  Recently, the organization has tried to aid the country during the new cholera epidemic, which has taken 2,000 lives so far.

Palin also focused on the long-term outlook for Haiti. “Haiti has been a country that has suffered in the past, that’s going to continue to suffer until some fundamental changes are being made here,” Palin said, according to Reuters, adding that the nation needed “job opportunities especially for the young people of Haiti.”

“God created man to work, to produce, to be able to contribute and to take care of one’s own family and one’s own community,” she added.

Palin, who stressed the importance of the U.S. maintaining financial assistance to Haiti, told CNN that she had found the country “much harsher than she expected.”

Just below is the video Samaritan’s Purse made about the trip.

Katrina Trinko — Katrina Trinko is a political reporter for National Review. Trinko is also a member of USA TODAY’S Board of Contributors, and her work has been published in various media outlets ...

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