The Corner

Religion

Paul and the Persecuted: Paul, Apostle of Christ Actor Talks about Christian Suffering Today

James Faulkner (right) and Jim Caviezel in Paul, Apostle of Christ (Columbia Pictures)

A few weeks ago, actor James Faulkner, who plays St. Paul in the new movie Paul, Apostle of Christ, travelled across the pond for a preview of the movie at The Sheen Center in New York City.

The film focuses on the last days of St. Paul, when he was imprisoned, tortured, and ultimately killed. “This is still going on,” Faulkner emphasized repeatedly during a Q&A after a viewing of a still-rough cut of the film. In the film, during his solitude, Paul is faced with his sins of the past, the persecution he inflicted on Christians before becoming one himself.

Faulkner reflected on the limited time he had to prepare for the role. While he was familiar with the life of Paul from Sunday school and a Christian boarding school as a boy, he wasn’t as familiar with Paul’s final days. “I was unaware of what his sufferings might have been in prison.” In the script, Paul’s confrontation in his solitude with those whom he’s persecuted “is one of the most important aspects of the film.”

Faulkner continued: “What he did to people. What is done to people. . . All around us people are still persecuted for their faith. It’s happening now. It’s happening increasingly in the last few years.”

Reflecting on grace and the life of St. Paul Faulkner said, “Love of our fellow man is the most important thing in the world. Even those who are not able to advance love, even they — even they — deserve redemption in the end. I grasped the significance of the film the moment I read the script. A wonderful script and a wonderful role for an actor to play.

“I am deeply affected. . . by what has been happening,” he said. “I feel this is an important film. I feel it is very important to reaffirm the Christian faith at this time, to re-engender the respect for it. I’m tired of the church being denounced and other faiths being preferred and their supremacy echoed. That’s why I did the film.”

Most Popular

World

In Appreciation, and against (Too Much) Nostalgia

To put it a little self-pityingly: It seems that my gurus are going, and the world’s. Richard Pipes, the great historian of Russia and the Soviet Union, died on Thursday; Bernard Lewis, the great historian of the Middle East, died yesterday. We had them both for a long time. Pipes was born in 1923, Lewis way ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Keeping Catholic Foster Care in Philly

Last week, the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty filed a complaint in a Pennsylvania district court on behalf of foster parents working with Catholic Social Services at the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Despite issuing a recent plea for more people to step up as candidates for foster parents, the city of ... Read More
Culture

Comedians Are Catching On

The comedians are beginning to catch on. Over the weekend -- just one week after featuring a bevy of top-line Hollywood stars impersonating members of the Trump administration, as well as a cameo by a vengeful Stormy Daniels asking for President Trump’s resignation -- Saturday Night Live finally acknowledged ... Read More
PC Culture

The Nature of Progressive Insensitivity

Former vice president Joe Biden is back in the news yet again. For a second time, he seems surprised that poor residents of the inner city are capable of doing sophisticated jobs: We don't think ordinary people can do things like program, code. It's not rocket science, guys. So, we went and we hired some folks ... Read More
Culture

The Feminization of Everything Fails Our Boys

Let me share with you two troubling — and, I believe, closely linked — news reports. The first, from this weekend, comes courtesy of the American Enterprise Institute’s Mark Perry. In one chart, he highlights the dramatic and growing gender gap in higher education. In short, women are dominating: ... Read More