The Corner

‘Politics Is Hard!’

Anyone remember the ruckus a few years back when (if I recall this correctly) the toy people came out with a talking Barbie doll that included in its repertoire the phrase “Math is hard!”? As I recall it, the feminists went nuts (but I repeat myself). Well, I’m starting to think we need a liberal Ken doll who says “Politics is hard!” (Wait, I know what you’re thinking! That’s what MSNBC is for! I concede.)

I’m continually amazed at the liberal inability to decide if Reagan was as awful as they always said years ago (Think Progress is happy to stay faithful), or really a swell guy, certainly a moderate if not a closet liberal, as Eugene Robinson argued his Washington Post column this week. I deliver a long and thorough fisking of Robinson’s argument about Reagan and taxes over at the Powerline Blog this morning, but there’s more to say about this, namely, that this whole line of argument, based on an inability to tell the difference between a person’s principles and his necessary compromises, reveals a childlike grasp of politics.  

Ultimately, Robinson’s column refutes itself in a single sentence whose irony is surely lost on him: “[Reagan’s] biggest impact on domestic politics was that the center of gravity shifted to the right — enough, in fact, that what were once extreme views have become orthodox.”   

Precisely, Eugene. That’s how the big-time players in politics do things. Still think Reagan was a crypto-liberal?

Most Popular

History

Thanksgiving Is Not a Lie

We live in a time of heedless iconoclasm, and so one of the country’s oldest traditions is under assault. Thanksgiving is increasingly portrayed as, at best, based on falsehoods and, at worst, a whitewash of genocide against Native Americans. The New York Times ran a piece the other day titled, “The ... Read More
History

Thanksgiving Is Not a Lie

We live in a time of heedless iconoclasm, and so one of the country’s oldest traditions is under assault. Thanksgiving is increasingly portrayed as, at best, based on falsehoods and, at worst, a whitewash of genocide against Native Americans. The New York Times ran a piece the other day titled, “The ... Read More
Culture

On Being Grateful

My mother always enjoyed making Thanksgiving dinner. She took a traditional Southern woman’s pride in being a good cook, following her mother’s recipes, and my family made a rare display of kindness by declining to inform her that she was a fairly dreadful cook, one whose kitchen alchemy on the electric range ... Read More
Culture

On Being Grateful

My mother always enjoyed making Thanksgiving dinner. She took a traditional Southern woman’s pride in being a good cook, following her mother’s recipes, and my family made a rare display of kindness by declining to inform her that she was a fairly dreadful cook, one whose kitchen alchemy on the electric range ... Read More
U.S.

Gratitude: What We Owe to Our Country

Editor’s Note: The following essay by National Review founder William F. Buckley comes from the first chapter of his 1990 book, Gratitude: Reflections on What We Owe to Our Country. I have always thought Anatole France’s story of the juggler to be one of enduring moral resonance. This is the arresting and ... Read More
U.S.

Gratitude: What We Owe to Our Country

Editor’s Note: The following essay by National Review founder William F. Buckley comes from the first chapter of his 1990 book, Gratitude: Reflections on What We Owe to Our Country. I have always thought Anatole France’s story of the juggler to be one of enduring moral resonance. This is the arresting and ... Read More

The Imaginary Trump

Like Andrew Jackson, Donald Trump is man who represents the age in which he lived. Whatever you may think of the age. Jackson embodied a generation of men who had risen and made their mark in a young country. He represented their desire for greater representation, even if it had costs for slaves and Indians. He ... Read More

The Imaginary Trump

Like Andrew Jackson, Donald Trump is man who represents the age in which he lived. Whatever you may think of the age. Jackson embodied a generation of men who had risen and made their mark in a young country. He represented their desire for greater representation, even if it had costs for slaves and Indians. He ... Read More