The Corner

Portman Demands Answers from Obama

In a new letter, Senator Rob Portman of Ohio asks President Obama to provide details about his administration’s dealings with the IRS. “After a year of false denials that the IRS was engaged in political targeting, it is now time for the administration to answer congressional inquiries fully and accurately,” he writes.

Here are his specific requests:

1.       Any written communications or notes of oral communications from White House officials or Treasury Department political appointees to the Internal Revenue Service concerning the standards for monitoring, approval, or disclosure of contributions to or spending by 501(c)(4) organizations or other tax-exempt organizations.

2.      Any written communications or notes of oral communications from White House officials or Treasury Department political appointees to the Internal Revenue Service concerning tax compliance or enforcement policy related to 501(c)(4) organizations.

3.      Any written communications or notes of oral communications from White House officials or Treasury Department political appointees to the Internal Revenue Service concerning political activity by 501(c)(4) organizations.

The full letter is here.

Robert Costa — Robert Costa is National Review's Washington editor and a CNBC political analyst. He manages NR's Capitol Hill bureau and covers the White House, Congress, and national campaigns. ...

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