The Corner

Pro-Market, Not Pro-Business

Crony capitalism has been at the core of the Obama administration’s domestic policy. From health care to energy, banking to automobiles, they have sought to consolidate and manage a static economy through the collusion of big government, big business, and big labor. This has meant choosing a few big players to favor, treating them essentially as public utilities, and squeezing out competitors both in the private economy and in civil society. And the big  players in each sector have of course fully cooperated and benefitted from it all. But many Republicans, wary of seeming to be critical of private companies rather than just the government, have not quite found the language in which to criticize this deeply troubling trend. Mitt Romney in particular would be wise to take up the subject, and would be especially well positioned to do it (and to use it to lay out the nature of his own quite different experience in the private economy, beyond the Obama campaign’s ludicrous caricatures). He would do well to start by reading Irwin Stelzer on the subject in the new Weekly Standard. And you should too.

Yuval Levin — Yuval Levin is the editor of National Affairs and a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center.

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