The Corner

re: Franken Wins

No, no, no. Not yet, anyway. From my Background Recount Guy:

Coleman will file an election contest. The biased and inconsistent rulings handed down by the partisan Sec or State Mark Ritchie and the canvassing board he heads demands that Coleman do so, more than for himself but for every Minnesotan who cast a legitimate vote.

The latest ripoff, adding the absentee ballots that Franken wanted to count while refusing to consider 650+ absentees Coleman wanted considered, is only the latest in a long string.

Because the count now stands at 225 for Franken, I worry that some on our side might go wobbly. They ought not to. The absentee ballot issue, the double counted vote issue, and the MPLS lost ballot issue would provide more than enough votes to swing the tally back in Coleman’s favor. People may not realize that the election contest is much more detailed and will allow the pertinent issues to be examined much more thoroughly and much more fairly than the recount process, especially as it has been run by the very partisan Ritchie.

This is far from over.

UPDATE: I e-mailed Scott Johnson — the original Recount Guy — this morning for a response: “The issues he cites are bona fide, but I don’t think Norm has been the subject of a partisan rip-off by the canvassing board or the Minnesota Supreme Court. We’re waiting to hear from the Mn Supreme Court on that 650 absentee ballot issue Norm wanted addressed. It will probably have to be raised in an election contest, assuming Norm chooses to file one.”

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