The Corner

Re: Knock, Knock

From a reader:

Jonah: I’m mostly concerned about the no-knock rule because of the increasing militarization of our police forces. More and more routine warrants are being served by swat teams in no-knock swat raids — which just doesn’t seem right to me. With an increase in such raids there’s an increase in mistakes — cops raiding the wrong house, etc — and that gets innocent people terrified or killed. I know if someone broke into my house I’d rise with a gun to fight them off — and get myself killed for it, for daring to defend my family. I guess it’s an aesthetic thing — it just doesn’t feel right. Is America supposed to be like that? Sure, if they knock loudly and wait it gives the badguys warning — possibly enough time to flush the evidence. But if they’re looking for a serious drug dealer, would that delay really be enough time to wake up, relaize what’s happening, and flush everything? A few crack rocks, sure — but certainly not an ounce of pot or a kilo of coke. I have to admit to being one of those evil Libertarians, so I guess I deserve an ad hominem. Anyhow, Radley Balko has been posting alot about Paramilitary police raids, and it’s worth taking a look through.

Most Popular

A Few Cracks in the Progressive Wall

The contemporary progressive agenda — of, say, an Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, or Elizabeth Warren — has rarely appealed to 51 percent of the American electorate. Most polls show opposition to Court packing and the abolition of the Electoral College. Voters don’t seem to like ... Read More

A Few Cracks in the Progressive Wall

The contemporary progressive agenda — of, say, an Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, or Elizabeth Warren — has rarely appealed to 51 percent of the American electorate. Most polls show opposition to Court packing and the abolition of the Electoral College. Voters don’t seem to like ... Read More

Trump: No

Editor’s Note: The following is one of three essays, each from a different perspective, in the latest edition of National Review on the question of whether to vote for President Trump. The views below reflect those of the individual author, not of the NR editorial board as a whole. The other two essays can be ... Read More

Trump: No

Editor’s Note: The following is one of three essays, each from a different perspective, in the latest edition of National Review on the question of whether to vote for President Trump. The views below reflect those of the individual author, not of the NR editorial board as a whole. The other two essays can be ... Read More

Trump: Yes

Editor’s Note: The following is one of three essays, each from a different perspective, in the latest edition of National Review on the question of whether to vote for President Trump. The views below reflect those of the individual author, not of the NR editorial board as a whole. The other two essays can be ... Read More

Trump: Yes

Editor’s Note: The following is one of three essays, each from a different perspective, in the latest edition of National Review on the question of whether to vote for President Trump. The views below reflect those of the individual author, not of the NR editorial board as a whole. The other two essays can be ... Read More
Elections

Why Hunter?

Hunter Biden, Joe’s younger son, has become a fixture of the 2020 race. Since August 27, 2019, Donald Trump has tweeted about Hunter 59 separate times, making his colorful past one of the Trump campaign’s most important attacks on his rival. For many years, Hunter struggled with serious drug and alcohol ... Read More
Elections

Why Hunter?

Hunter Biden, Joe’s younger son, has become a fixture of the 2020 race. Since August 27, 2019, Donald Trump has tweeted about Hunter 59 separate times, making his colorful past one of the Trump campaign’s most important attacks on his rival. For many years, Hunter struggled with serious drug and alcohol ... Read More