The Corner

Re: Scotland

Andrew: Let us not leave the subject of Scotland and her many marvels

without a passing tribute to that noble country’s most… enthusiastic poet,

William McGonagall. Did you know that the Bard of Dundee once apostrophized

the very city in which you now earn your neaps and tatties? “Oh mighty City

of New York! you are wonderful to behold, / Your buildings are magnificent,

the truth be it told, / They were the only things that seemed to arrest my

eye, / Because many of them are thirteen storeys high…” But it was in the

contemplation of disasters that mighty McGonagall truly soared above the

Aonian mount. Who that has read them can possibly forget his verses on the

Tay Bridge catastrophe of 1879?

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We live in a time of heedless iconoclasm, and so one of the country’s oldest traditions is under assault. Thanksgiving is increasingly portrayed as, at best, based on falsehoods and, at worst, a whitewash of genocide against Native Americans. The New York Times ran a piece the other day titled, “The ... Read More
History

Thanksgiving Is Not a Lie

We live in a time of heedless iconoclasm, and so one of the country’s oldest traditions is under assault. Thanksgiving is increasingly portrayed as, at best, based on falsehoods and, at worst, a whitewash of genocide against Native Americans. The New York Times ran a piece the other day titled, “The ... Read More
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My mother always enjoyed making Thanksgiving dinner. She took a traditional Southern woman’s pride in being a good cook, following her mother’s recipes, and my family made a rare display of kindness by declining to inform her that she was a fairly dreadful cook, one whose kitchen alchemy on the electric range ... Read More
Culture

On Being Grateful

My mother always enjoyed making Thanksgiving dinner. She took a traditional Southern woman’s pride in being a good cook, following her mother’s recipes, and my family made a rare display of kindness by declining to inform her that she was a fairly dreadful cook, one whose kitchen alchemy on the electric range ... Read More
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U.S.

Gratitude: What We Owe to Our Country

Editor’s Note: The following essay by National Review founder William F. Buckley comes from the first chapter of his 1990 book, Gratitude: Reflections on What We Owe to Our Country. I have always thought Anatole France’s story of the juggler to be one of enduring moral resonance. This is the arresting and ... Read More