The Corner

Politics & Policy

Another Reason There Are So Few Elected Republican Women

Reporters surround Sen. Susan Collins on Capitol Hill, September 26, 2018. (Joshua Roberts/Reuters)

The media revels in pointing out that while it was another “Year of the Woman,” with record numbers of women running for and winning office, the surge was solely among Democrats and the number of Republican female lawmakers has declined. They feign such disappointment, but are clearly overjoyed at the opportunity to advance their narrative that the GOP ignores women.

Certainly, the GOP deserves blame for failing to prioritize recruiting and supporting female candidates, for not elevating excellent conservative female lawmakers, and for offering only tepid support for organizations that specifically engage women.

Yet these media stories supposedly searching for an explanation for this sad phenomenon overlook how the media and leftist feminist groups share part of the blame. Their vicious treatment of conservative women discourages potential female candidates from throwing their hats in the ring.

Consider the different futures that female Democratic and Republican political leaders must prepare for. The Democrat woman can expect glowing reports on her rise from the national news media; slots on leading daytime talk shows and late-night comedy shows where she will face softball questions, glowing and one-sided descriptions of her policy agenda; and, if she climbs the political ladder, airbrushed photo shoots in glamorous fashion magazines and invitations to A-list media parties in New York and Hollywood.

The Republican woman should expect to be ignored by most of the mainstream media or described as a token in a party meant for white men. She should expect consistently hostile treatment from reporters, both in print and on television, and — if she’s really successful — to be viciously caricatured on Saturday Night Live, have protesters frequenting her office, and have her family hounded out of restaurants.

Is it really so surprising that fewer Republican women are running for office?

Certainly, Republican party leaders and activists should be more proactive in women’s outreach, both for voters and for candidates.  They need more members working as hard as Republican Elise Stefanik to enlist women and improve the party’s brand with women.

But the left should spare us their preening and fake concern about missing Republican lawmakers. Their consistently biased treatment of conservative women is a part of a deliberate strategy to silence and discourage women on the right.

Most Popular

Elections

Weirdo O’Rourke

Friends of the young Bill Clinton and Barack Obama spoke of the special glow of promise they had about them, even back in their early twenties. Angels sat on their shoulders. History gave them a wink and said, “Hey, good lookin’, I’ll be back to pick you up later.” Robert O’Rourke? Not so much. He ... Read More
Education

Our Bankrupt Elite

Every element of the college admissions scandal, a.k.a “Operation Varsity Blues,” is fascinating. There are the players: the Yale dad who, implicated in a securities-fraud case, tipped the feds off to the caper; a shady high-school counselor turned admissions consultant; the 36-year-old Harvard grad who ... Read More
U.S.

McCain at Annapolis

President Trump has been doing a lot of tweeting today -- against TV programs, companies, and other things that have incurred his displeasure. These tweets make for interesting reading. One of them is this: So it was indeed (just proven in court papers) “last in his class” (Annapolis) John McCain that sent ... Read More
Health Care

David Brooks Forgets to Oppose Some Suicides

The well-meaning David Brooks urges us to prevent suicide in his most recent New York Times column. The crisis is certainly real. From "How to Fight Suicide:": You’ve probably seen the recent statistics about the suicide epidemic — that suicide rates over all have risen by over 30 percent this century; ... Read More