The Corner

Refugee Bill Easily Passes House; Almost Certain to Get Blocked in Senate

The House easily passed a bill Thursday that would suspend the program allowing Syrian and Iraqi refugees into the U.S. until key national security agencies certify they don’t pose a security risk.

The vote was 289-137, with 47 Democrats joining 242 Republicans in favor of the bill, creating a majority that could override President Barack Obama’s promised veto. It also faces an uncertain future in the Senate, where Minority Leader Harry Reid said he will try to block the bill.

Unless something changes, though, the future seems pretty certain. It looks like the White House has rallied Senate Democrats —​ witness how Chuck Schumer is back on board  and they will kill the bill in the Senate. 

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